This forum uses cookies
This forum makes use of cookies to store your login information if you are registered, and your last visit if you are not. Cookies are small text documents stored on your computer; the cookies set by this forum can only be used on this website and pose no security risk. Cookies on this forum also track the specific topics you have read and when you last read them. Please confirm whether you accept or reject these cookies being set.

A cookie will be stored in your browser regardless of choice to prevent you being asked this question again. You will be able to change your cookie settings at any time using the link in the footer.

EMT recertification
#21
(31-08-2017, 10:04 PM)TraineeEMT Wrote: To be honest I have no intention of coming back to work for the HSE in the near future. The ambulance service back home sounds like hard work lately.
My life is here now in Dorset. I wanted my licence back just to work for a friend at events more than anything and maybe the odd duty with the Red Cross.

I've heard some bad stories about ambulance services in the UK. I've always got the impression that they're far more underesourced than we are, and that the pay is fairly poor. I suppose it varies from service to service. Personally wouldn't fancy working over there. Their little vanbulances doing frontline work are a bit embarrassing too.
Reply
#22
(04-09-2017, 01:35 AM)Nasco Wrote: I've heard some bad stories about ambulance services in the UK. I've always got the impression that they're far more underesourced than we are, and that the pay is fairly poor. I suppose it varies from service to service. Personally wouldn't fancy working over there. Their little vanbulances doing frontline work are a bit embarrassing too.

I don’t really want to turn this into where is better or worse. Every ambulance service has its faults and the one I work for is no different but it’s just what faults your happy to work with.
I can’t comment on vanbulances as we use box bodied Mercs somewhat the same as the HSE.
As for pay newly qualified paramedics in my trust are being paid band 5 and then 2 years post qualification we go to band 6 plus 25% unsocial.
Resourcing is difficult now as paramedics are being used in hospital, minor injury units and GP surgeries which is taking people away from front line work as the lure of no unsocial hours is appealing.


How many patient contacts are needed as an EMT per year to keep current?
Reply
#23
12 per year


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Those who can, do.

Those who can't do, teach.

Those who can't do or teach....... Manage!
Reply
#24
Vidar, are you in my neck of the woods this week?
Reply
#25
Yes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Those who can, do.

Those who can't do, teach.

Those who can't do or teach....... Manage!
Reply
#26
(03-09-2017, 09:08 PM)TraineeEMT Wrote:
(03-09-2017, 07:22 PM)MRX Wrote: I think waiting two years post registration is only right, and personally I would even extend it. There are APs out there who went on the course having never attended a cardiac arrest. Ridiculous.

I have to say I disagree with the 2 year wait as there is no real difference between an Irish AP and a UK paramedic. The skills base is comparable and the range of drugs are similar from what I see at a quick glance.
What makes you think the wait is a correct thing?

If you leave the skills and drugs out of it, I'm just talking about exposure and experience. I was watching a series on BBC a couple of years back about student paramedics in the UK.....one of them was crying at a cardiac arrest. I feel you should have relevant exposure to what the job throws at you before you become an AP in Ireland and become "Clinical Lead" at a scene.
It's not the HSE's opinion, it's not managements opinion, it's mine. All mine.
Reply
#27
That program called student paramedics showed me that direct entry straight from school would bring in students without any life experience. Communication and some life skills are crucial in the job I believe.

But we seem to be following the educational flow that other parts of the world use.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The man who never made a mistake never made anything!
Reply
#28
That’s a fair point. However that programme only took the direct university route to Paramedic. It doesn’t take into account people who have been in the job for years working as an ECA, Tech or Advanced Tech before being a student.
We remain working full time and undergo our uni course in our own time for 2.5 years before qualifying. So we would have 4/5 years experience before being paramedics.
I totally agree there is a huge difference between part of a crew and lead clinician as the buck stops with the lead. Just I feel the duration of 2 years is a bit long to wait for some.
Reply
#29
Anyone know what happens when you dont get to renew your EMT license due to not having completed the required CPC. Do you revert to being an EFR or just to being some guy. Situation is an EMT's CFRA is out of date so they are not deemed to be active enough to be permitted to do the upskilling. The said EMT whilst having done a number of duties with the organisation hasn't actually had any patient contacts in the 12 months as they have been quiet duties where there's been no patients. While its a lot of work to become an EMT it's getting harder to hold on to the licence. I know some lads have gone to the likes of Concerts to get their patient contacts but that opportunity hasn't arisen.
Reply
#30
They can make a case to PHECC that they have put in the hours for patient contacts but have not had the opportunity to get any

Also they have an option of doing their upskilling privately

Alas if they don't hold onto their EMT licence the best they will be in a CFR if they hold a current certificate which they need to have yearly


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The man who never made a mistake never made anything!
Reply
#31
Ask @hooch

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
JUST CALL ME PROBIE
Reply